Tears at the gas pump, food supply opportunities and the NHL star who won’t be named

A Finnish commentator declined to name a hockey player supporting Putin during games.

Switching to an electric vehicle is too expensive for many Finns. Image: EPA/All Over Press

Rising fuel prices have been difficult for many people to manage. In rural Finland, where distances are greater and services fewer, people have been hit hardest.

“Driving is as minimal as it gets besides school and work. Even so, I cry every time I fill up,” said a 19-year-old woman in the HS questionnaire.

Another woman said that she reduced the frequency of her children’s leisure activities, because the 100 km round trip cost 20 euros in fuel each time they went.

Some said they would cut back on the essentials to better afford the gasoline they need, but that wasn’t a sustainable option.

Many of those who responded to the survey said they had considered buying an electric vehicle to reduce fuel costs, but the acquisition would be too expensive for them.

HS notes that help is on the way. The tax deduction for commuting will be temporarily raised in July from 7,000 euros to 8,400 euros. Last week’s budget also relaxed the requirement for oil companies to include biofuels in the diesel mix.

This will fall from 19.5% to 12% for two years, but experts say the impact on prices at the gas pump could be negligible.

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Invest in hunger

The cost of food is also rising globally, due, among other things, to supply chain shocks caused by the war in Ukraine.

The paper focuses on agricultural technology investments, rather than speculation in commodity markets, and offers several investment funds that provide a portfolio with some exposure to the latest food production technology.

Food security is not limited to agriculture, according to Vesa Engdahl of Front Wealth Management, and there is a big difference between investing in the cash price of different grains and investing in companies that seek to improve food security.

“We really have big challenges globally, and in agriculture and grain production there is a lot to do,” Engdahl said. “For example, in India, around 40% of agricultural produce spoils due to poor logistics and storage.”

There has not yet been a big return on these investments. Beyond Meat, a vegetarian protein company, and Oatly, which makes vegan dairy alternatives, both saw their stock prices plummet.

Analysts say KL has potential, however, thanks to ‘megatrends’ of population growth and climate change.

Poutinist Hockey

Russian media picked up a Finnish ice hockey commentator by Tero Kainulainen unique way to call Washington Capitals NHL games.

Kainulainen recently declined to use the Capitals captain’s name, Alexander Ovechkin, in his comments. Ovechkin is known as a supporter of Putin, posting photos of him with the authoritarian Russian leader and refusing to criticize the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Instead of saying his name, Kainulainen uses formulations like “number eight”, “captain of the Capitals” or even “gray beard”.

This has annoyed some in Russia, according to Ilta-Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun). Vyacheslav Fetisova former hockey player who is now a member of the Russian State Duma and a former sports minister, said Kainulainen’s habit was “not even worthy of attention”.

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