reports siirryt – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 16:07:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thistuesday.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-120x120.png reports siirryt – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ 32 32 Tuesday newspapers: visit to the United Kingdom, advocacy for biodiversity and nuclear hope | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 06:48:56 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media. The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle 15.3. 08:48•Updated 15.3. 16:44 Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings. He was […]]]>

President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media.

The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle

Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings.

He was attending a meeting of the Joint Expeditionary Force, a UK-led Nordic and Baltic security coalition.

Along with this, Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) whom he also met Prince Charlesincorporating a Tweet in which Niinistö claimed to have had “substantive” discussions with Niinistö.

Paper leads with by Vladimir Putin signing his last call with Niinistö, which ended with the Russian leader saying “I am available”.

Niinistö said he thought it might be a tactic, to appear open to talks, but also seemed keen to talk and might want to reach out to Western leaders.

The big call he would like, according to Niinistö, is the American president Joe Biden. He said it could happen “in the near future”.

Beware of beetles

A Helsingin Sanomat editorial (siirryt toiseen palveluun) protests against the forest plantations that dominate the Finnish countryside, highlighting a concrete threat to this limited ecosystem.

Spruce bark beetles are a healthy part of a normal forest, which has a multitude of different tree species and dead tree trunks on the ground providing natural habitats for many beetle predators.

In plantations, however, monoculture allows these tiny insects to run wild. A spruce plantation has only spruce trees, a perfect environment for beetles to fight their way through, killing the trees that are their food.

The document says that efforts to protect biodiversity are underway, but must take into account the social and economic importance of forests in Finland.

Nuclear to the rescue

Finland’s energy mix has been in the news recently, with Russia’s attack on Ukraine raising questions about both the Rosatom-backed Fennovoima project and the import of electricity from Russian power plants.

Business newspaper Kauppalehti suggests (siirryt toiseen palveluun) in an editorial that this dependence could soon end, thanks in part to the Olkiluoto 3 reactor which went online over the weekend.

The newspaper estimates that on Monday alone, imports from Russia amounted to some 3.7 million euros – a sharp increase in Russia’s hard currency reserves, as sanctions continue to isolate the country’s economy.

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Tuesday newspapers: New minister, lost votes and towed cars | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-minister-lost-votes-and-towed-cars-news/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 07:25:43 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-minister-lost-votes-and-towed-cars-news/ Aki Lindén took office on Monday as Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services. Aki Lindén started work on Monday. Image: Henrietta Hassinen / Yle 8.2. 09:25•Update 8.2. 09:40 Finland has a new minister on Monday, as a Social Democrat MP Aki Linden took office as Minister of Social Affairs and Health. He replaces Krista […]]]>

Aki Lindén took office on Monday as Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services.

Aki Lindén started work on Monday. Image: Henrietta Hassinen / Yle

Finland has a new minister on Monday, as a Social Democrat MP Aki Linden took office as Minister of Social Affairs and Health.

He replaces Krista Kiuru (SDP), who is going on maternity leave. Helsingin Sanomat interviewed (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Lindén on his first day, with the new minister outlining his views on the Covid situation.

Although he has backed restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of coronavirus in his role as a backbench MP, he says he is right behind the government’s decision to ease them this month.

The impact of long periods of distance learning on children and young people has been particularly severe and poorly understood within the Finnish government.

That said, he reminded readers that deaths are higher than ever in the outbreak, even though the danger to healthy people from current variants is not as high and the burden on healthcare providers from health is weak.

“That’s more than it has been at any time during the pandemic over a similar period,” Lindén said. “I would not minimize the deaths, even if they are elderly people. Many of them would have had many years of life ahead of them. At the start of the crisis, the management of it rested on a strong sense of solidarity with vulnerable people.”

Hunt for votes in Pirkanmaa

Fallout from regional elections continues in Tampere newspaper Aamulehti, which reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) about a fearless Christian Democrat who tracked down votes she thought were hers, but hadn’t been counted.

Sirpa Pursiainen checked the distribution of the vote tally by electoral district and noticed that she had not received any votes in her home district, even though she had (obviously) voted for herself.

At the same time she saw that party mate Kylli Niemela had received thirty advance votes in Terälahti, his village on the northern outskirts of Tampere, despite having no connection to the region.

His candidate number, which must be listed on the ballot, was 443, while Pursiainen’s was 453. Niemelä got no votes in the village on election day.

“In Terälahti the votes usually go to the locals,” Pursiainen said, alluding to the parochial concerns that tend to dominate village politics in much of Finland.

She contacted the election authorities, who realized their mistake and transferred the votes. Not that it makes much difference: Pursiainen was elected anyway, and the two candidates are from the same party.

AL reports that volunteer vote checkers discovered three more errors in the vote recording, with 1-4 votes involved in each and the results unchanged once rectified.

Towed car prices

Iltalehti continues its coverage (siirryt toiseen palveluun) of the weekend convoy protest, with an overview of the cost of recovering a car if towed from a parking space in the middle of Mannerheimintie.

Most of the vehicles towed Friday night were removed after midnight and taken somewhere nearby, rather than impounded. But car owners will still get a bill, and that can be cumbersome.

The city of Helsinki charges between 118 and 162 for towing a car, with higher costs for four-wheel drive vehicles. There is also an overnight charge of 127 euros if the city has to move it between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., bringing the maximum payable to 289 for the most unfortunate protesters in the convoy.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Covid Decisions, Delays in Booster Injections and Finns Return Abroad for Christmas | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-covid-decisions-delays-in-booster-injections-and-finns-return-abroad-for-christmas-news/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 07:27:19 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-covid-decisions-delays-in-booster-injections-and-finns-return-abroad-for-christmas-news/ It’s a big day for meetings before Christmas to discuss Covid restrictions. Vaccination centers are overflowing with impatient vaccines. Image: Petri Kivimäki / Yle Finland is in the throes of a sharp increase in Covid cases, and with the new Omicron variant seemingly more transmissible than previous versions of the coronavirus, there is a clamor […]]]>

It’s a big day for meetings before Christmas to discuss Covid restrictions.

Vaccination centers are overflowing with impatient vaccines. Image: Petri Kivimäki / Yle

Finland is in the throes of a sharp increase in Covid cases, and with the new Omicron variant seemingly more transmissible than previous versions of the coronavirus, there is a clamor for greater restrictions on daily life to try and slow the spread. .

Aamulehti has a good summary (siirryt toiseen palveluun) of the calendar. At noon, the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health and the National Institute of Health and Welfare (THL) will hold a briefing on the Covid situation.

THL boss Markku Terhahauta said on Saturday it was time to suspend use of the Covid pass to bypass restrictions on restaurant and bar opening hours, for example.

The story continues after the graph

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At 4 p.m., ministers meet to discuss their national policy response. They can tighten the restrictions or stop the Covid pass clause that allows establishments requesting Covid passes to avoid any restrictions.

AL also notes the Pirkanmaa Covid coordination group meeting at 3:30 p.m. They will discuss what local restrictions they may impose for the Tampere area, with the choice apparently either to ban large events altogether or to severely restrict the number of people allowed to attend.

The all new Tampere Arena has seen several huge events in recent weeks, with a capacity of 13,000 spectators for ice hockey matches and concerts.

Restrictions are also on the agenda for Helsingin Sanomat, which is not avoiding the difficult timing of the current upsurge on a case-by-case basis, just before the holiday season.

The paper has a great feature (siirryt toiseen palveluun) on Finns living abroad returning home after more than a year without seeing their families, a reminder that the pandemic is considerably more difficult for people separated from their loved ones to overcome.

On the other hand, the paper editorial (siirryt toiseen palveluun) suggests that pubs and churches should be closed, remote working encouraged, and that people should spend Christmas at home with their families.

That’s how Finns make Christmas anyway, the newspaper says, so it shouldn’t be too difficult this year.

Delayed boosters

Many people are now trying to get a third dose of the Covid vaccine, and find that the dates are meager in the field. There is a gap between the three largest municipalities in the capital region, with Vantaa in the lead by offering boosters.

The northernmost Helsinki region council has been offering booster shots to anyone over the age of 18 since December 14, but Helsinki itself has only opened bookings for people not exposed to a high risk of Covid on Monday.

There have been complaints online that these times are mostly in January. But it’s better than the situation in Espoo, reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Iltalehti, where those over 18 who are not in risk groups can only get their reminder appointments from Tuesday.

Even then, these periods are reserved for people aged 50 to 59. So far, only 15.5% of those over 12 in Finland have received three doses of the Covid vaccine.

The story continues after the graph

Some parts of the article content may not be accessible, for example, with a screen reader.

Olkiluoto begins

In energy news, Tuesday was a landmark day in Finnish history as the third reactor at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant finally began operating.

The very delayed reactor was ignited at 3:22 a.m. The local newspaper Satakunnan Kansa was at hand (siirryt toiseen palveluun) for this momentous event, noting that the west coast facility is expected to produce around 14 percent of Finland’s electricity needs.

The reactor should be connected to the Finnish grid in January.

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Tuesday Articles: Government Talks, Slowing Vaccination Rate, Breast Cancer Breakthrough | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-articles-government-talks-slowing-vaccination-rate-breast-cancer-breakthrough-new/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 07:13:56 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-articles-government-talks-slowing-vaccination-rate-breast-cancer-breakthrough-new/ Government to meet on Tuesday to discuss new measures to deal with worsening Covid-19 situation Only 5% of the Finnish population received the third dose of the vaccine Image: Jorge Gonzalez / Yle Yle News Concerns over the new variant of the Omicron virus and the deteriorating Covid-19 situation in Finland again made national headlines […]]]>

Government to meet on Tuesday to discuss new measures to deal with worsening Covid-19 situation

Only 5% of the Finnish population received the third dose of the vaccine Image: Jorge Gonzalez / Yle

Concerns over the new variant of the Omicron virus and the deteriorating Covid-19 situation in Finland again made national headlines on Tuesday, with several newspapers reporting that the government will meet to discuss potential solutions on Tuesday.

Topics for discussion will include an assessment of the current epidemiological situation in the country, the progress of vaccination and border traffic control in light of the new variant, according to the daily. Karjalainen (siirryt toiseen palveluun).

Government sources have revealed that although no decision has yet been taken, authorities are considering closing Finland’s borders or strengthening internal border controls within the Schengen area.

The government could also make vaccination compulsory for healthcare workers.

Currently, tourists from southern African countries that have reported multiple cases of the Omicron variant are banned from entering Finland.

The Institute of Health and Welfare (THL) is investigating two suspected cases of Omicron in the country.

Finland lags behind on immunization

According to a report (siirryt toiseen palveluun) by Helsingin Sanomat, Finland distributed the third vaccine against Covid-19 much more slowly than other countries in the EU.

About 37 percent of people aged 12 and over received the third dose in Iceland, while the equivalent figure in Hungary is 25 percent and in Malta 21 percent.

This figure is around 10 percent in Spain and Lithuania and 9 percent in France. In contrast, on Monday, only 5% had received the third jab in Finland.

Finland’s current vaccination strategy aims to ensure that the majority of the population has received the second dose and to prepare to vaccinate children under 12 years of age.

Medical experts have recommended Finland to speed up its vaccination rate to avoid worsening immunity to the virus.

The third jab is currently only available to people over 60 and those belonging to medical risk groups.

Finnish scientists breakthrough in breast cancer research

Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that researchers at the University of Helsinki and Aalto University have successfully developed a “mini breast cancer” gel that will help improve treatment for breast cancer.

The new method makes it easier to study hormone receptors to determine the effectiveness of hormone therapy.

The finding has important implications because 70 percent of breast cancers are hormone receptor positive, that is, they involve cells that contain hormone receptors or molecules that bind to a specific hormone.

Studying hormone receptors under laboratory conditions will make it easier for pharmaceutical companies to develop more effective drugs.

Breast cancer is currently the most common type of cancer among the working-age population in Finland, affecting 5,000 women each year.

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Hospital burden, Finland’s ‘hellish’ fur farms and increased employment https://thistuesday.org/hospital-burden-finlands-hellish-fur-farms-and-increased-employment/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 07:21:32 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/hospital-burden-finlands-hellish-fur-farms-and-increased-employment/ On Tuesday morning, media covered the challenges facing Finnish hospitals and a briefing on the cruel conditions on fur farms Health officials worried about increase in influenza and RSV cases Image: Alamy / All Over Press Yle News As of Monday, 322 people had been hospitalized after contracting the virus, up from 284 a week […]]]>

On Tuesday morning, media covered the challenges facing Finnish hospitals and a briefing on the cruel conditions on fur farms

Health officials worried about increase in influenza and RSV cases Image: Alamy / All Over Press

As of Monday, 322 people had been hospitalized after contracting the virus, up from 284 a week ago and 255 the week before, according to data from the Finnish Institute of Health and Welfare (THL).

Helsingin Sanomat too reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that hospitals face an additional burden from patients who become ill from other viruses, especially seasonal influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

The Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District (HUS) has had to increase its intensive care units from 15 to 21 to accommodate the growing number of Covid-19 patients requiring intensive care.

According to Jari Petäjä, HUS Acting Chief Medical Officer, the number of Covid-19 patients is expected to increase at a moderate pace due to increased vaccine coverage; however, health officials are troubled by the growing number of cases of influenza and RSV.

SHU hospitals are currently treating a total of 20 patients for the RSV virus, which primarily affects children. “We are pessimistic and believe that the RSV epidemic will be severe, as was the case in Sweden,” said Petäjä.

British tabloid reveals ‘hellish’ fur farms in Finland

The presentation, which was Underline (siirryt toiseen palveluun) by Ilta-Sanomat, paints a disturbing picture of animals in distress, claiming that foxes have been left behind with untreated deformities and illnesses as well as uncontrolled obesity.

He quotes Kristo Muurimaa from Finnish animal welfare group Oikeutta Eläimille as claiming that this is “the norm” in Finland, which is the largest producer of fox fur in Europe.

The story also alleges that most foxes are killed before being skinned at just eight months old.

Although it does not mention the name or location of the farms in question, the article includes many disturbing images of the animals, which are said to be kept in small cages without litter.

Sudden employment is a pleasant surprise

In addition, there were 37,000 fewer unemployed this month compared to a year ago.

Pasi Sorjonen, the chief economist of the Akava trade union confederation wrote that the employment trend was “strong” on Twitter, calling the lower-than-expected unemployment figures a “good surprise”.

Jukka Appleqvist, chief economist of the Finnish Chamber of Commerce, echoed the sentiment, saying the employment figures were “excellent” in a tweet.

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Tuesday’s Diaries: Vaccination Division, Pet Registry, Nazi Name Error | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-diaries-vaccination-division-pet-registry-nazi-name-error-new/ https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-diaries-vaccination-division-pet-registry-nazi-name-error-new/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 06:34:57 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-diaries-vaccination-division-pet-registry-nazi-name-error-new/ Helsingin Sanomat writes that Finnish health officials continue to favor carrot-batting when it comes to boosting absorption of the coronavirus vaccine. If approved by parliament, a new animal welfare law will require all dogs and cats to be microchipped and registered. Image: Miikka Varila / Yle Yle News The Helsinki Daily Helsingin Sanomat (siirryt toiseen […]]]>

Helsingin Sanomat writes that Finnish health officials continue to favor carrot-batting when it comes to boosting absorption of the coronavirus vaccine.

If approved by parliament, a new animal welfare law will require all dogs and cats to be microchipped and registered. Image: Miikka Varila / Yle

The Helsinki Daily Helsingin Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun)asks the question: is society divided into worlds of the vaccinated and the unvaccinated?

As the newspaper points out, despite earlier projections, coronavirus vaccine coverage for the population over 12 had not yet exceeded 80 percent as of Monday. Although the target is likely to be reached in the coming days, it is clear that enthusiasm for the vaccination has waned.

At the same time, HS notes, the number of Covid hospitalizations is climbing to a new pandemic record. The growing need for hospital care is partly explained by the high number of cases among those who are not vaccinated against the virus.

It was believed that vaccination would crush the pandemic, but now Finnish experts believe the pressure on hospitals will continue for years to come. The problem also seems to be that many people, for one reason or another, do not want to be vaccinated.

Helsingin Sanomat therefore wonders if we can find ourselves in a world where compulsory vaccination is required in certain sectors, a strict Covid “passport” is in place, or even confinements imposed on the unvaccinated.

Mika salminen, director of health security at the National Institute of Health and Welfare (THL), told the newspaper that he hopes there will be no polarization in society.

“We know that coercion will not solve the problem of slowing vaccination, but can even lead to worsening attitudes,” Salminen said.

“Carrots are always a better option. The starting point should be to share the right information and make it understandable,” he added.

The coronavirus has come to stay, Salminen stressed, and it is also inevitable that the situation will place an additional burden on health care for several years to come.

For this reason, he stressed that there should be a public debate on the continued impact on health resources and on labor shortages in the field. This is a question which concerns not only Finland, but also the rest of Europe.

Pet Registry

The tabloid Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that the government consider making microchip and the registration of all cats and dogs mandatory in the next few years.

The plan is included in the government’s proposal for a new animal welfare law, which was circulated for review last week.

To date, neither the chip nor the registration of dogs or cats has been mandatory. Registration of pets with the Kennel Club and the Cat Association is a prerequisite for participating in competitions or shows.

Chipping has long been required by the Kennel Club. According to the Kennel Club Harri lehkonen over 70 percent of the Finnish dog population has been recorded.

A microchip is required for purebred kittens to be registered with the Cat Association, and it is also possible to register domestic cats in the microchip registry.

Microchip and registration are seen by animal welfare organizations as a partial solution to the “cat crisis”. According to the Finnish Animal Care Association (SEY), it is estimated that at least 20,000 cats are abandoned in Finland each year. It is hoped that the microchip of all cats would drastically reduce that number.

A new law on animal welfare is due to come into force in early 2023. Microchipping and registration of all dogs will be compulsory from the beginning of the same year, and for cats from 2026.

Nazi name error

The Swedish language daily Hufvudstadsbladet (siirryt toiseen palveluun)notes what he describes as “awkwardness” on the part of officials at the Finnish Patent and Registration Office.

On May 27 of this year, the office authorized a company to be called “Oy Arbeit Macht Frei Ltd”.

“Arbeit Macht Frei” is a German expression meaning “Work frees you”, a Nazi slogan best known to appear at the entrance to the Auschwitz concentration camp.

The Patent and Registration Office has now announced that the name was approved in error and has apologized for the error.

“We are sorry. The administrator in question does not speak German and did not remember that the expression was inappropriate,” the office wrote on Twitter.

The company in question still uses the name. The Patent and Registration Office said it was preparing to have it revoked by the Supreme Administrative Court.

Snow, rain and slippery roads

After a wintry start to the week in much of the country, the weather is expected to warm up again from Tuesday. The cold is expected to return by the weekend, however, according to the Helsinki statement. Iltalehti (siirryt toiseen palveluun).

Snowfall is expected in western and central areas on Tuesday, changing to rain late in the day, with the possibility of storm-level gusts of wind.

There is a warning of dangerous driving conditions all over the country, with the exception of the southern coastal areas. The roads are likely to be slippery, especially in the central and northern areas, as temperatures start to rise.

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Tuesday Newspapers: NATO support, border shopping and scooter injuries | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-nato-support-border-shopping-and-scooter-injuries-new/ https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-nato-support-border-shopping-and-scooter-injuries-new/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-nato-support-border-shopping-and-scooter-injuries-new/ Tuesday’s articles follow a theme from Monday’s visit to NATO. Electric scooter riders have suffered numerous injuries in Finland, but new restrictions on their use have helped to reduce their numbers. Image: Tommi Pylkkö / Yle Yle News 26.10. 09:31•Updated on 26.10. 09:35 Most papers to carry (siirryt toiseen palveluun) news from the Eva think […]]]>

Tuesday’s articles follow a theme from Monday’s visit to NATO.

Electric scooter riders have suffered numerous injuries in Finland, but new restrictions on their use have helped to reduce their numbers. Image: Tommi Pylkkö / Yle

Most papers to carry (siirryt toiseen palveluun) news from the Eva think tank survey on NATO membership, which suggests that a few more Finns now think it would be a good idea for Finland to join the alliance.

Some 40 percent of those polled said they did not want Finland to become a NATO country, while 26 percent said they believed the country should join the Western Military Club.

This support is up four percentage points from the 22% figure recorded a year ago. It comes after the NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg visited Helsinki on Monday, reminding Finland that they have a close partnership – but that is not as good a guarantee of security as membership.

Eva also published a poll on Monday suggesting that Finns are increasingly critical of Russia, with 60% of those responding to the survey saying they see Russia as a military threat.

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Drop in border shopping

Retailers along the eastern border, meanwhile, are hoping for a less threatening invasion, with tourists returning to malls and shopping parks set up to meet their needs.

Helsingin Sanomat has summer in Vaalimaa (siirryt toiseen palveluun), one of the three big border points, to see how the “Zsar” shopping center is doing.

It hasn’t made a profit since it opened in 2019, and with declining visitor numbers and just 25 of the 60 units rented. The center is a point of sale, aiming to sell last year’s designer items at a discount while seeking a clientele consisting of 25% Russian visitors and 75% domestic buyers.

It doesn’t work so well with Covid restrictions limiting travel between the two countries. In 2019, more than 5.5 million people passed through checkpoints on the eastern border, and this year that number has fallen to half a million.

The scooter injury crisis has subsided

Iltalehti reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that the scooter injury crisis, which had filled the Helsinki emergency services with injured scooters, has eased somewhat.

In July, some 80 patients arrived at hospitals in the Helsinki and Uusimaa region after an electric scooter crash, raising concerns among health officials about rental mobility aids.

As of September, that number was 15, and since new rental restrictions were introduced there has been a further drop – only 6 scooter-related injuries in October so far.

That same month, Helsinki agreed with scooter rental companies that they would not be available after midnight on weekends, in a bid to limit their use by drunk drivers.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Green Changes, Man Found and Olympic Stadium Complaints | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-green-changes-man-found-and-olympic-stadium-complaints-new/ https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-green-changes-man-found-and-olympic-stadium-complaints-new/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-green-changes-man-found-and-olympic-stadium-complaints-new/ Tuesday, the press ruminates on the major political changes. The renovation of the 1930s stadium began in 2016. Image: Tomi Hänninen Yle News The board of directors of the Finnish Green Party met on Monday evening to decide who would replace the party leader Maria ohisalo as Minister of the Interior when she begins her […]]]>

Tuesday, the press ruminates on the major political changes.

The renovation of the 1930s stadium began in 2016. Image: Tomi Hänninen

The board of directors of the Finnish Green Party met on Monday evening to decide who would replace the party leader Maria ohisalo as Minister of the Interior when she begins her parental leave.

It was not a simple process, reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Iltalehti. The six-hour meeting was effectively to decide who would get the thankless job of running the Home Office, not a natural wallet for pro-immigration Greens, who typically back climate protesters.

The party’s deliberations were a bit of a sudoku puzzle. Pekka Haavisto remained Minister of Foreign Affairs, and the party did not want two men to occupy three of their ministerial posts.

The heavily Helsinki-based party also wanted a representative of the regions on its ministerial team. That’s why they chose Tampere MP earlier Iiris Suomela, the youngest MP in Finnish history, to serve as leader during Ohisalo’s absence. But Suomela didn’t want to be a minister.

In the end, the deputy Joensuu Krista mikkonen was chosen as Minister of the Interior, stepping down from her current post as Minister of the Environment.

The media had reported her initial rejection of the job over the weekend, but she eventually agreed to take on the task.

“I would have been happy to continue as Minister of the Environment, but we thought about it for a long time and thought it was a good solution for the party as a whole,” Mikkonen said. “I will now hurry to familiarize myself with the work of the Minister of the Interior. “

Upon his return, Ohisalo will assume the portfolio of the Minister of the Environment. In the meantime, Helsinki MP Emma Kari will get the job.

Resolved disappearance

Ilta-Sanomat has a happy ending to a story that began thirteen years ago, when a man disappeared from his home in the small logging village of Kolho.

The 52-year-old was not seen again and in 2014 was declared “missing” after his relatives reported him to police.

Since then, his name and photo have been published regularly in the local newspaper, but no sightings have been reported. Until now.

Police said they located the man in Keuruu, a town about 20 km north of Kolho. The man had lived his life uneventfully in the meantime and just did not want to be contacted.

Ilta-Sanomat trip (siirryt toiseen palveluun) to Kolho to add color to the story, finding a lot of respect among the townspeople for a man who just wanted a quiet life.

“You can do whatever you want on your own,” said a local resident Hannele airikka. “It’s wonderful that this man has found his own way to live his life.”

The renovation of the Olympic stadium gets the green light

The Helsinki Olympic Stadium underwent a 330 million euro renovation which was completed during the pandemic with great architectural success.

The building underwent its first real stress test this weekend, when nearly 30,000 fans attended Finland’s World Cup qualifiers against Ukraine. It was a disappointing night for the Eagle Owls, who suffered a 2-1 loss to leave their hopes of a World Cup final hanging by a thread.

But the stadium itself didn’t do very well either. Fans have complained about not being able to use the washroom, buying refreshments and long queues all over the place.

First of all Ilta-Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun)then Kauppalehti (siirryt toiseen palveluun) reported the problems, with stadium officials attributing the problems to a lack of information and a shortage of security personnel to provide advice.

One problem was the toilet. Because the stadium is a protected structure and not much can be changed there, the renovation was unable to expand the halls to add toilets and bars.

Instead, there is an underground “WC-World” offering facilities for 500 fans at a time to do their business, out of sight. Indeed, it was so well hidden that people couldn’t find it and ended up escaping through the fence instead.

Fans attending the France game in November are urged to look for turnstiles, toilets and bars in other parts of the stadium as they can move freely from one section to another and do not have to use the entry point or the action facilities where their real seat is located.

KL says that with big events slated for next summer, including stadium concerts by Ed Sheeran, Antti Tuisku and Sunrise Avenue, organizers face a battle to find or train enough stewards and security personnel. .

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Tuesday’s newspapers: regional elections, winter of discontent and house prices | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-regional-elections-winter-of-discontent-and-house-prices-new/ https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-regional-elections-winter-of-discontent-and-house-prices-new/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-regional-elections-winter-of-discontent-and-house-prices-new/ Finland is holding regional elections in January. The leader of the Center Party, Annika Saarikko, strongly hopes that citizens will vote in the regional elections next January. Image: Lehtikuva Yle News 28.9. 09:20•Update 28.9. 13:16 The Center Party launched its regional electoral campaign on Monday, announcing its desire to take control of a majority of […]]]>

Finland is holding regional elections in January.

The leader of the Center Party, Annika Saarikko, strongly hopes that citizens will vote in the regional elections next January. Image: Lehtikuva

The Center Party launched its regional electoral campaign on Monday, announcing its desire to take control of a majority of the new regional authorities.

Enthusiasm for the election may be low, according to a recent poll, but for the Center Party, it is a joyous event.

The party has long advocated for another layer of elected government, and finally got its wish with the new assemblies set up to control health and social care services on a regional basis.

Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) this party leader Annika saarikko said his party’s goal was to make sure every municipality keeps a health center, even as pressure increases to cut costs and streamline services.

This pressure is likely to fall on tiny rural municipalities which tend to elect large numbers of Center Party advisers, so his party has more skin in the game than most.

“The last experience of a new election in Finland was linked to the European elections some 20 years ago,” Saarikko said. “Now, in the same way that a new electoral culture is being created, and we encourage people to vote. If the problem with the European elections was that the questions seemed distant, we are now getting closer to day-to-day business. people.”

Strike warning

Iltalehti carries a warning (siirryt toiseen palveluun) industrial action that could disrupt export industries this winter. The problem lies in the industrial sector, where negotiations on a new collective agreement have not even started.

Employers’ association Technology Industries of Finland said its members now have the choice of joining a new organization to negotiate a sectoral agreement or to negotiate workplace by workplace.

Only 391 companies signed to be bound by joint negotiations, the rest of the 1,600 companies of the association preferring to negotiate locally.

This means that there will soon be a situation where workers are no longer covered by a collective agreement and can legally go on strike to improve their conditions. Employers can also call lockouts as part of their bargaining strategy.

If employers and unions representing more than half of the employees in a sector agree to an agreement, it will be deemed binding even on companies that did not participate in the talks. In practice, this is the situation for the vast majority of the Finnish workforce, but this situation appears to be changing.

Prolonged industrial disputes could herald a more unequal Finland, in which universal annual wage increases play a less important role in narrowing the income gap.

It’s part of the plan, according to Iltalehti, with employers’ organizations and influential right-wing thinkers suggesting in recent years that binding agreements and universal pay standards should be called into question.

High house prices

The Finnish National Association of Estate Agents released forecasts on Monday suggesting that the housing market is likely to continue its long boom.

Helsingin Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that agents see no downward pressure on prices, with a shortage of newer and larger properties making life more difficult for buyers in many areas.

However, the association said some sellers had raised asking prices too much, which meant they would have to wait longer to sell their properties.

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Tuesday Newspapers: New Testing Strategy, Covid Passports, Helsinki Transport Strike | New https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-testing-strategy-covid-passports-helsinki-transport-strike-new/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-testing-strategy-covid-passports-helsinki-transport-strike-new/ Newspapers are reporting a new government coronavirus testing plan and that Covid passports might not be needed after all. A sign pointing to a coronavirus testing station in Helsinki. Image: Markku Ulander / Lehtikuva Yle News The Helsinki tabloid Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) he received reports that a new coronavirus screening strategy prepared by […]]]>

Newspapers are reporting a new government coronavirus testing plan and that Covid passports might not be needed after all.

A sign pointing to a coronavirus testing station in Helsinki. Image: Markku Ulander / Lehtikuva

The Helsinki tabloid Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) he received reports that a new coronavirus screening strategy prepared by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health was approved on Monday. The plan aims to free up testing capacity and allocate more human resources to the diagnosis and treatment of other diseases.

According to the newspaper, once rolled out, the new plan will not contain a recommendation for testing otherwise healthy people with mild symptoms who have been fully vaccinated and who are not in a particular risk group.

The same goes for anyone who has been cured of Covid for more than six months and who has received at least one dose of the vaccine.

However, anyone who shows symptoms or is suspected of being infected will continue to have the opportunity to get tested.

A lower screening threshold will be applied to fully immunized health and social workers, all people at special risk and all patients entering a hospital or emergency care.

The document stresses that reducing testing requires adequate vaccine protection for the population and a good regional epidemic situation. Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) has repeatedly referred to 80 percent immunization coverage in the population over the age of 12 as a milestone.

According to Ilta-Sanomat, on Monday, 82.8% of the population aged 12 and over had received a first dose of a coronavirus vaccine and 64.1% had received two.

The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health is expected to announce its new screening policy in the near future.

Covid passports still arriving?

The document points out that some other countries, such as the United Kingdom and Denmark, have recently suspended their plans for vaccination documents that would have allowed access to certain events and places.

Although Britain’s plan for England is not being rolled out at the moment, officials have said it is being held “in reserve”.

Helsingin Sanomat writes that as in the UK, a Covid passport plan in Finland has not been launched, is still under consideration and would require legislation that could come into force in October at the earliest.

On the other hand, a plan is in place to further open up society when 80 percent of residents over the age of 12 have received two vaccines, or made available to the general population. This should take place at the end of October.

The Director of the Department of Health Security of THL, Mika salminen told the newspaper that even with the situation improving, further preparations for the deployment of a Covid passport were worth it.

“If a Covid passport is needed, it would exist,” Salminen told HS. “Whether or not to introduce it, and whether it is necessary or not, these are questions that will then be assessed.”

Helsingin Sanomat also points out that if a Covid passport were introduced, it would be short-lived. The government’s most recent strategy called it a “middle ground” before fully opening up the company.

“Travel itself is no longer a major risk,” he said. “Of course, you should always look at the situation in each country yourself. But a categorical recommendation to avoid travel has ended.”

THL is expected to update its official travel recommendations this week.

Transport strike in Helsinki

The drivers are protesting against a plan to incorporate the HKL city transport authority which excludes the metro system. It is said that the most recent restructuring plan does not correspond to what was agreed between the city management and the representatives of the drivers during the cooperation negotiations last spring. The drivers called a strike after the rejection of a request for an investigation and review.

The two-day strike will begin at 4 a.m. on Thursday, and according to HKL CEO City Lehmuskoski, which will paralyze all tram and metro traffic.

The Helsinki Regional Transport Authority told Hufvudstadsbladet that it would not provide additional bus or commuter train services during the strike.

Another phishing scam

Finland’s National Cyber ​​Security Center reports that the emails, which appear genuine at first glance, inform recipients that a new payment services directive requires account login and acceptance of terms, otherwise the customer’s account will be closed.

The message is completely false and Cyber ​​Security Center says that anyone who provided login information through the link in the email should contact their bank immediately.

A second, almost identical, email scam is also in circulation.

If you entered your password, you should change it as soon as possible. And, if you think you’ve been scammed, you can also report the crime to the police.

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