helsingin sanomat – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 16:07:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thistuesday.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-120x120.png helsingin sanomat – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ 32 32 Tuesday newspapers: visit to the United Kingdom, advocacy for biodiversity and nuclear hope | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 06:48:56 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media. The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle 15.3. 08:48•Updated 15.3. 16:44 Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings. He was […]]]>

President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media.

The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle

Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings.

He was attending a meeting of the Joint Expeditionary Force, a UK-led Nordic and Baltic security coalition.

Along with this, Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) whom he also met Prince Charlesincorporating a Tweet in which Niinistö claimed to have had “substantive” discussions with Niinistö.

Paper leads with by Vladimir Putin signing his last call with Niinistö, which ended with the Russian leader saying “I am available”.

Niinistö said he thought it might be a tactic, to appear open to talks, but also seemed keen to talk and might want to reach out to Western leaders.

The big call he would like, according to Niinistö, is the American president Joe Biden. He said it could happen “in the near future”.

Beware of beetles

A Helsingin Sanomat editorial (siirryt toiseen palveluun) protests against the forest plantations that dominate the Finnish countryside, highlighting a concrete threat to this limited ecosystem.

Spruce bark beetles are a healthy part of a normal forest, which has a multitude of different tree species and dead tree trunks on the ground providing natural habitats for many beetle predators.

In plantations, however, monoculture allows these tiny insects to run wild. A spruce plantation has only spruce trees, a perfect environment for beetles to fight their way through, killing the trees that are their food.

The document says that efforts to protect biodiversity are underway, but must take into account the social and economic importance of forests in Finland.

Nuclear to the rescue

Finland’s energy mix has been in the news recently, with Russia’s attack on Ukraine raising questions about both the Rosatom-backed Fennovoima project and the import of electricity from Russian power plants.

Business newspaper Kauppalehti suggests (siirryt toiseen palveluun) in an editorial that this dependence could soon end, thanks in part to the Olkiluoto 3 reactor which went online over the weekend.

The newspaper estimates that on Monday alone, imports from Russia amounted to some 3.7 million euros – a sharp increase in Russia’s hard currency reserves, as sanctions continue to isolate the country’s economy.

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Tuesday’s Newspapers: NATO Executive, Anti-Russian Sentiment, Supermarket Quarrel | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-nato-executive-anti-russian-sentiment-supermarket-quarrel-news/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 07:12:57 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-nato-executive-anti-russian-sentiment-supermarket-quarrel-news/ The Finnish government is preparing to submit a report to Parliament that could serve as the framework for a debate on NATO membership this spring. The debate on NATO membership continues in Finland. Image: EPA-EFE/All Over Press 8.3. 09:12•Update 8.3. 11:52 Tuesday marks the 13th day of Russia’s war on Ukraine, with the invasion and […]]]>

The Finnish government is preparing to submit a report to Parliament that could serve as the framework for a debate on NATO membership this spring.

The debate on NATO membership continues in Finland. Image: EPA-EFE/All Over Press

Tuesday marks the 13th day of Russia’s war on Ukraine, with the invasion and its aftermath once again dominating newspaper headlines in Finland.

Helsingin Sanomat, the most widely circulated daily, writes (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that the government is preparing to submit a report to parliament that could play a key role in how policymakers discuss Finland’s modified and changing foreign and security policies.

HS adds that the main purpose of the report is to ensure that MPs have enough information to discuss the issues, but a source tells the newspaper that it also “provides a framework for the NATO debate”.

The main politicians of the country, including the president Sauli Niinisto and prime minister Sanna Marin (SDP) – have so far remained silent on their position on Finland’s potential NATO membership, HS explaining that their reluctance is necessary in order to ensure as open a debate as possible.

“It is quite difficult for the parties to genuinely discuss NATO membership if, for example, the President and the Prime Minister have shared their views in one way or another,” the newspaper writes. .

In a separate article, HS asks (siirryt toiseen palveluun) what NATO membership would mean for Finland, looking at the issue from angles such as defense budgets, military preparations and cooperation with the EU.

But the bigger question, HS points out, would be the impact on Finland’s relations with Russia.

This relationship – especially in political and economic terms – has virtually collapsed since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, writes HS, noting that the Russian Foreign Ministry has said a few times recently that a Finland’s application for NATO membership would have “military and political consequences”.

“Underlying Russia’s opposition is the idea that the prestige of a great power is weighed against losses and gains in the geopolitical game. Each new member of NATO is thus considered as a kind of loss of prestige”, explains Katri Pynnöniemiassistant professor at the National Defense University.

Anti-Russian sentiment on the rise

Tampere-based Aamulehti is one of several newspapers to report (siirryt toiseen palveluun) from the STT news agency that hate speech against Russians living in Finland has increased since the invasion of Ukraine.

Niina SinkkoPresident of the Finland-Russia Association, recounts how even her organization – which AL says is not politically aligned and aims to strengthen cross-cultural cooperation at the local level – has also been targeted.

“The mission of our organization has been misunderstood by many. It is believed that we support or receive funds from the Russian regime. That was never the case,” Sinkko said, adding that the harsh rhetoric continued despite the group condemning the Russian regime. invasion on its website and social media channels.

“Yet there is a stigma that has been directed at our employees and our members,” she said.

AL adds that Russian speakers are the largest minority language group in Finland, with more than 84,000 people speaking Russian as their mother tongue in Finland in 2020, according to Statistics Finland.

But in practice, an even larger group uses the language on a day-to-day basis and – notes the paper – people who speak Russian can come from many different countries, including Ukraine and Estonia.

Nearly 30% of the Ukrainian population speaks Russian as their native language, and for someone who doesn’t know both languages, Russian and Ukrainian may even sound the same.

“In the worst case, such anger can even be directed at a refugee who has escaped war,” Sinkko points out.

A Lidl too far?

Reports from the business magazine Taloussanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) following German supermarket chain Lidl’s announcement that no products from Russia or Belarus will feature in the supermarket chain’s ‘Eastern European Week’, which begins at its outlets on Thursday Finnish.

However, writes Taloussanomat, the company also decided to remove the “Russian-style” products from the week of special offers, causing a mixed reaction on social networks.

“I don’t understand why the grocery store [Lidl] begins to discriminate against Russian culture. This does not affect the state but ordinary Russians,” wrote one commentator.

“There is no reason to demonize Russian food culture, and culture in general, even in a situation like this. It would suffice to remove anything that benefits the economy of the Russian state, and therefore to its ability to wage war,” said another.

Meri Aaltomanager of the channel’s campaigns department, tells Taloussanomat that the decision to remove all Russian-related products was motivated by a desire to avoid confusion among customers.

“Although the themed products do not include products made in Russia, we have decided to exclude individual Russian-style products with, for example, text in Russian or other clear references to Russia,” says Aalto. .

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Tuesday Newspapers: Trains, planes and hockey players are all fleeing Russia | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-trains-planes-and-hockey-players-are-all-fleeing-russia-news/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 06:56:53 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-trains-planes-and-hockey-players-are-all-fleeing-russia-news/ The war in Ukraine continues to dominate the news in Finland. The Allegro train is one of the few remaining connections between Russia and the outside world. Image: Mikko Savolainen / Yle 1.3. 08:56•Update 1.3. 09:57 As Russia becomes increasingly isolated following the invasion of Ukraine, getting out of the country is a challenge. Flights […]]]>

The war in Ukraine continues to dominate the news in Finland.

The Allegro train is one of the few remaining connections between Russia and the outside world. Image: Mikko Savolainen / Yle

As Russia becomes increasingly isolated following the invasion of Ukraine, getting out of the country is a challenge. Flights have been blocked from many Western countries, and the few that are still able to take off are now considerably more expensive than they were just a few days ago.

This leaves trains to Finland as one of the few routes out of the country, and the Helsingin Sanomat newspaper went (siirryt toiseen palveluun) at Helsinki Central Station on Monday evening to meet one of the Allegro services from St. Petersburg.

There are two trains each way on the high-speed line after they restarted last year following a suspension due to Covid restrictions, with passenger numbers down from pre-pandemic levels.

Only Russian or Finnish citizens are allowed on the trains, thanks to a rule imposed by Russia. But there were still plenty of Monday passengers for HS to interview.

A Dutch-Russian couple were reunited in Helsinki before traveling to Holland, and Alyonnaa fleeing Russian, explained that the train was her only way out of the country.

Others had similar stories of joy at getting out and sadness at having to leave, but they were largely horrified by the war ordered by the Russian president. Vladimir Poutine.

VR told the newspaper that they would continue to run trains to Russia for the time being, and any decision to stop doing so would not be theirs alone.

Finnair shrinking

Russia’s isolation has had a huge impact on many businesses in the West, and Finnair is one of those currently struggling to reassess its strategy.

“This has never been seen before,” Mäntynen said. “Commercial and communication relations have weakened considerably between the different continents. In this sense, it is quite catastrophic.”

He says Finnair faces difficulties due to its strategy of offering a link between Europe and Asia – flying over Russia. This ‘shortcut’ promise no longer applies and the alternative route via the Middle East is an expensive solution for a Helsinki-based company.

The problem for Finnair, and the rest of us, is that they don’t know how long this situation will last, so they can’t plan for the future.

For now, the airline has canceled flights to Japan, China and Korea this week, and flights to Russia until May 28.

The company declined to comment on Iltalehti. CEO Topi Manner said in a statement on Monday that some of the company’s routes were not economically viable if they had to take a longer route, but that the company understood the urgency of the situation in Ukraine and the need for sanctions.

Tampere Kyiv Solidarity

The park was created in the Kaleva district as part of Tampere’s twinning with Kyiv in 1954.

Marko Anttila joins Ilves for the conclusion of the Finnish season, after his club Jokerit announced that it would not complete the Russian KHL playoffs.

Not to be outdone, their city rivals Tappara signed up Otto Leskinen and Veli-Matti Savinainen for the rest of the season.

The city is due to host the world championships in May, but as expected, the IIHF announced (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Monday evening that the Russian and Belarusian teams would not be allowed to compete there.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Ukraine Reaction, Snow Chaos | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-ukraine-reaction-snow-chaos-news/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 07:22:26 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-ukraine-reaction-snow-chaos-news/ Tuesday’s press wondered about the development of the situation in Ukraine. Vladimir Putin gave a wide speech on Monday evening. Picture: Kreml 22.2. 09:22•Update 22.2. 12:50 In Finland, a nation of the Russian Empire that seized its freedom in 1917, people followed the speech closely. While Putin spoke ostensibly about Ukraine, the implications of his […]]]>

Tuesday’s press wondered about the development of the situation in Ukraine.

Vladimir Putin gave a wide speech on Monday evening. Picture: Kreml

In Finland, a nation of the Russian Empire that seized its freedom in 1917, people followed the speech closely. While Putin spoke ostensibly about Ukraine, the implications of his more general anxiety over Russia’s status could be significant for Finland.

Finnish Ministers and the Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) published a identical statement on Twitter (siirryt toiseen palveluun)which read “Finland condemns the unilateral acts of Russia which violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. The recognition of the separatist regions in eastern Ukraine is a violation of international law and the Minsk agreements Finland responds to Russia’s actions within the EU framework.”

Finnish answers

Niinistö was recently tapped as one of the few Western leaders to speak regularly with Putin, and according to him, the current moves only concern eastern Ukraine and have no significance for Finland or the Baltic states. .

“Russia’s actions have been described as irrational or illogical,” Niinistö said. “Perhaps the rationality is exactly this: operating in a way that I’ve described as two steps forward, one back, and two aside. That’s the current movement, and it won’t stop. certainly not there.”

He added that while a diplomatic solution was not out of the question, the stakes of the game and the risks have increased.

On this note, Helsingin Sanomat requested (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Russian researcher Arkady Moshes what is happening now. According to him, war is not inevitable, as it is more likely that Russia will simply take control of Luhansk and Donbass without a wider invasion of Ukraine.

In this sense, the recognition of their independence is a sign of weakness: Russia probably does not have the forces necessary for a full invasion of Ukraine.

Iltalehti, meanwhile, published an opinion piece comparing Putin to Hitler and Stalin. The tabloid’s conclusion is that he is dangerous and must be stopped. The newspaper also indicates that the Fennovoima reactor, which will use a reactor from the Russian company Rosatom and is 34% owned by the Russian company, must be stopped.

It is a controversial project, with initial approval in 2014 leading to the resignation of the Green League from by Alexander Stubb (NCP), but the security risks have only increased since then. IL’s verdict is that the project cannot continue.

Snow chaos hits Helsinki

Far from Ukraine, reports Ilta-Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that much of southern Finland was blanketed in snow on Tuesday morning, with police advising motorists to be extra careful.

Commuters can also expect large-scale disruptions to public transport services, with trams blocked and buses cancelled.

The paper also has photos (siirryt toiseen palveluun) of the snowstorm, with stranded vehicles of all kinds demonstrating the risks of leaving home as this weather front passes over Finland.

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Tuesday’s Newspapers: Niinistö Analysis, Swedish Mortgages, Cucumber Cost | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-niinisto-analysis-swedish-mortgages-cucumber-cost-news/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 07:13:13 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-niinisto-analysis-swedish-mortgages-cucumber-cost-news/ The price of food and accommodation is on the rise. Are cucumbers becoming a luxury item in Finland? Image: Sannika Michelsson/Yle 15.2. 09:13•Updated 15.2. 09:13 President of Finland Sauli Niinisto has recently been in the international media, and it is a source of pride for many Finns. Ilta-Sanomat has a handy roundup (siirryt toiseen palveluun) […]]]>

The price of food and accommodation is on the rise.

Are cucumbers becoming a luxury item in Finland? Image: Sannika Michelsson/Yle

President of Finland Sauli Niinisto has recently been in the international media, and it is a source of pride for many Finns.

Ilta-Sanomat has a handy roundup (siirryt toiseen palveluun) interviews with Niinistö in recent days, describing his position as one of the few Western leaders to speak regularly with the Russian leader Vladimir Poutine.

The Sunday Times reported that only the former German chancellor Angela Merkel had more encounters with Putin than Niinistö.

The current crisis is, of course, why Niinistö is in demand. ISIS asks a professor of world politics Teivo Teivainen for his analysis of Niinistö’s media appearances.

“Niinistö was skilled in creating his relationship with Russia, and I say that as someone who doesn’t always just praise Niinistö,” Teivainen said. “He has maintained a relatively good channel of discussion with Putin – compared to other Western leaders – without giving the impression that he has, in the old-fashioned vernacular, been ‘Finlandized’, without the impression that he would be Putin’s poodle.”

Teivainen said that the French president’s mention of “Finlandization” Emmanuel Macron heightened interest in Finnish diplomacy, and Niinistö’s role has been to explain this as well as provide insight into Putin.

The term refers to the Cold War period when Finland remained a democracy, but was under constant pressure from the Soviet Union and had to meet Soviet demands in politics, economics and media.

Swedish loans last longer

Coverage of expected interest rate increases continues at Helsingin Sanomat, with another look at a topic close to the hearts of many people: mortgages.

This time the newspaper asks (siirryt toiseen palveluun) why Finland’s home loans are not like Sweden’s. Across the western border, it seems, interest-only mortgages and extremely long loan terms are very common.

The money Swedes save on loan repayments, they tend to invest in stocks or spend on consumption.

In Finland, on the other hand, people tend to have shorter loan terms and repay their home loans diligently. It’s a cultural difference, but HS reports that Finland is a bit more like Sweden.

There are more loans of 35 years or more in Finland, and people are starting to build up their own buffers through investments and savings, rather than making their mortgage the main financial instrument they use.

There is still a long way to go before Finns start adopting the attitude of the Swedish regulator Erik Thedeanwho told HS four years ago that “there is no sense in dying without debt”.

The idea of ​​having unpaid liabilities (and not feeling guilty about the prospect) remains a bit shocking to Finns, and HS made sure to bring up the interview.

food cost

Joensuu Karjalainen newspaper looks at the cost of food (siirryt toiseen palveluun), which has risen sharply in recent months. The newspaper was particularly distressed by the rise in cucumber prices to six euros a kilo, a level that makes the basic salad seem a bit of a luxury at present.

The cost of producing creeping vine plants in Finland is heavily impacted by the price of electricity, which is needed for heating and light during the dark Finnish winter.

Fertilizer and packaging costs have also increased, making the cost of fresh salads much higher than in a normal winter.

Statistics from the Institute of Natural Resources of Finland suggest that food prices are expected to increase by 2-2.5% this year.

The Finnish Greenhouse Growers Association says there may be no relief as the days get longer, as growers reduced their lighting in December in response to rising electricity prices. This will have a ripple effect on production in the future.

And for now at least, imported salad greens are unlikely to help alleviate the cost – in 2020 the amount of foreign cucumbers sold in Finland was a third of the 2014 figure.

This is not negative for everyone.

“It is a positive phenomenon that foreign cucumbers are not really found in stores anymore,” Niina Kangas of the producers’ association, says Karjalainen.

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Tuesday newspapers: New minister, lost votes and towed cars | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-minister-lost-votes-and-towed-cars-news/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 07:25:43 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-new-minister-lost-votes-and-towed-cars-news/ Aki Lindén took office on Monday as Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services. Aki Lindén started work on Monday. Image: Henrietta Hassinen / Yle 8.2. 09:25•Update 8.2. 09:40 Finland has a new minister on Monday, as a Social Democrat MP Aki Linden took office as Minister of Social Affairs and Health. He replaces Krista […]]]>

Aki Lindén took office on Monday as Minister of Family Affairs and Social Services.

Aki Lindén started work on Monday. Image: Henrietta Hassinen / Yle

Finland has a new minister on Monday, as a Social Democrat MP Aki Linden took office as Minister of Social Affairs and Health.

He replaces Krista Kiuru (SDP), who is going on maternity leave. Helsingin Sanomat interviewed (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Lindén on his first day, with the new minister outlining his views on the Covid situation.

Although he has backed restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of coronavirus in his role as a backbench MP, he says he is right behind the government’s decision to ease them this month.

The impact of long periods of distance learning on children and young people has been particularly severe and poorly understood within the Finnish government.

That said, he reminded readers that deaths are higher than ever in the outbreak, even though the danger to healthy people from current variants is not as high and the burden on healthcare providers from health is weak.

“That’s more than it has been at any time during the pandemic over a similar period,” Lindén said. “I would not minimize the deaths, even if they are elderly people. Many of them would have had many years of life ahead of them. At the start of the crisis, the management of it rested on a strong sense of solidarity with vulnerable people.”

Hunt for votes in Pirkanmaa

Fallout from regional elections continues in Tampere newspaper Aamulehti, which reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) about a fearless Christian Democrat who tracked down votes she thought were hers, but hadn’t been counted.

Sirpa Pursiainen checked the distribution of the vote tally by electoral district and noticed that she had not received any votes in her home district, even though she had (obviously) voted for herself.

At the same time she saw that party mate Kylli Niemela had received thirty advance votes in Terälahti, his village on the northern outskirts of Tampere, despite having no connection to the region.

His candidate number, which must be listed on the ballot, was 443, while Pursiainen’s was 453. Niemelä got no votes in the village on election day.

“In Terälahti the votes usually go to the locals,” Pursiainen said, alluding to the parochial concerns that tend to dominate village politics in much of Finland.

She contacted the election authorities, who realized their mistake and transferred the votes. Not that it makes much difference: Pursiainen was elected anyway, and the two candidates are from the same party.

AL reports that volunteer vote checkers discovered three more errors in the vote recording, with 1-4 votes involved in each and the results unchanged once rectified.

Towed car prices

Iltalehti continues its coverage (siirryt toiseen palveluun) of the weekend convoy protest, with an overview of the cost of recovering a car if towed from a parking space in the middle of Mannerheimintie.

Most of the vehicles towed Friday night were removed after midnight and taken somewhere nearby, rather than impounded. But car owners will still get a bill, and that can be cumbersome.

The city of Helsinki charges between 118 and 162 for towing a car, with higher costs for four-wheel drive vehicles. There is also an overnight charge of 127 euros if the city has to move it between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., bringing the maximum payable to 289 for the most unfortunate protesters in the convoy.

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MPs return to work, Covid restrictions lifted, nurses’ vaccine pass in effect and ski lessons online https://thistuesday.org/mps-return-to-work-covid-restrictions-lifted-nurses-vaccine-pass-in-effect-and-ski-lessons-online/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 07:41:44 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/mps-return-to-work-covid-restrictions-lifted-nurses-vaccine-pass-in-effect-and-ski-lessons-online/ The long Christmas holidays are over for Finnish MPs. Parliament gets back to work on Tuesday. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle 1.2. 09:41•Update 1.2. 10:22 Parliament resumes work after the Christmas recess on Tuesday, and there is a long list of items in the legislature’s inbox. Helsingin Sanomat has a summary (siirryt toiseen palveluun)major issues. The government […]]]>

The long Christmas holidays are over for Finnish MPs.

Parliament gets back to work on Tuesday. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle

Parliament resumes work after the Christmas recess on Tuesday, and there is a long list of items in the legislature’s inbox. Helsingin Sanomat has a summary (siirryt toiseen palveluun)major issues.

The government plans to present 166 legislative proposals in the spring and another 122 in the fall. HS suggests that individual laws will not be a source of huge conflict, but the broad outlines of the government’s economic policies will spark heated debate among MPs.

Government parties have agreed to propose jobs measures that will improve public finances by €110 million a year, with a deadline of February 15 to come up with a package.

Opposition parties have criticized the government for its reluctance to implement unemployment benefit cuts to try to get people back to work, but reduced access to early pensions for older jobseekers has agreed earlier by the government parties.

Meanwhile, climate measures must also be debated, as the government reinforces its target to be carbon neutral by 2035.

This includes measures to reduce emissions from transport and agriculture, two contentious issues.

The ending theme that HS reports is Covid. Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) said on Monday it believed restrictions could be lifted this month, but government parties are meeting on Wednesday to discuss further.

Restrictions lifted

Iltalehti has a list (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Covid rules changing on Tuesday February 1st. Restaurants serving primarily food can remain open until 9 p.m., with alcohol sales ending at 5 p.m. and a restriction on numbers to 75% capacity.

Movie theaters can reopen in many areas, as can gyms and swimming pools. The recommendation for higher education institutions to switch to distance learning ends, with institutions having to decide how they proceed.

Border checks of passengers from Schengen countries also ended on January 31, while checks of passengers from non-Schengen EU countries end on February 1.

All passengers arriving from outside the EU therefore remain subject to Covid pass checks and require proof of Covid vaccination or recovery and a negative Covid test result.

The government has also lifted its recommendation that people only meet with five people outside their family at a time.

Vaccines for caregivers

Meanwhile, Ilta-Sanomat has a report (siirryt toiseen palveluun) on the establishment of an obligation to vaccinate people in contact with people at risk of serious complications from Covid, which comes into force on Tuesday. Different regions of Finland interpret the rules differently.

In Tampere, nothing will change, unvaccinated nurses will be able to continue working. But in Turku, refusing to be vaccinated against Covid could lead to lost wages.

Tampere will reassess the situation on February 14. He uses a clause in the law that allows employers to use unvaccinated staff in extenuating circumstances, saying staff absences mean they have little choice.

A local health official told IS that absences are currently three times higher than normal.

While nurses should take the vaccine to protect themselves, according to Nohynek, they do not prevent infection and transmission – so they will not ensure patients are protected against Covid.

Online ski lessons

It’s the peak of the ski season in Finland, with cross-country trails covering most of the country after heavy snowfall over the weekend.

The nature of the sport is that many people have long breaks between skiing opportunities, due to lack of snow, equipment or interest.

The video shows the proper technique for those looking to do Nordic-style cross-country skiing, and the accompanying article includes tips on where to go for decent trails and even in-person lessons.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Russian Media Silent, Dry January and Student Deal | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-russian-media-silent-dry-january-and-student-deal-news/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 07:32:18 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-russian-media-silent-dry-january-and-student-deal-news/ As the United States and NATO prepare for a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine, Finnish newspapers explore Russian media reactions to NATO talks in Finland. Finland observed Dry January or “tipaton tammikuu” for decades, while maintaining a state monopoly on alcohol sales. Image: Petri Aaltonen / Yle 25.1. 09:32•Update 25.1. 09:53 Russia is less than […]]]>

As the United States and NATO prepare for a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine, Finnish newspapers explore Russian media reactions to NATO talks in Finland.

Finland observed Dry January or “tipaton tammikuu” for decades, while maintaining a state monopoly on alcohol sales. Image: Petri Aaltonen / Yle

Russia is less than enthusiastic about the prospect of NATO expanding to its northwestern border. That said, Russian media criticized Finland and Sweden for revisiting NATO membership issue, writes Helsingin Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun).

While some Russian commentators said Russia’s actions were pushing Finland into the arms of NATO, others suggested Finland was not acting in a friendly manner. The media, for example, described Finland’s purchase of F-35s as a “hostile gesture towards Russia”.

State media Ria Novosti claimed Finland’s president Sauli Niinisto and prime minister Sanna Marin knowingly or unknowingly playing into the hands of the US-led alliance. A Russian defence-focused think tank published an article suggesting that “it would be better to warn the northern neighbors of what awaits them if they choose the wrong side and what they will be left with if they do it”.

Russia’s official policy towards Finland’s NATO membership has not changed in the meantime. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov recently said that Russia respects Finnish and Swedish sovereignty and that it is up to “their people” whether or not to join the alliance.

Will Finland join NATO? This week’s All Points North takes stock of the debate. After months of discussion and diplomacy by political leaders, Finland’s commitment to the so-called “NATO option” is clear.

Daily drinkers

With Finland in the middle of its annual month of abstinence from alcohol, tipaton tammikuu, readers of Ilta-Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) are flocking to a story about alcohol causing liver damage sooner than people think.

As in the rest of Europe, liver disease is a growing problem in Finland, according to Kaarlo Simojoki, a substance abuse expert at the University of Helsinki.

Drinking one to three servings of alcohol with a meal on a daily basis is enough to cause cirrhosis of the liver if this habit persists for longer.

“It’s something that people don’t understand. When it comes to liver health, another thing that’s important, in addition to quantities, is whether the liver is under regular stress,” explained Simojoki.

study pays

Business magazine Talouselämä (siirryt toiseen palveluun) reports that graduating on time pays off, citing research by Kela showing that she partially repaid student loans belonging to approximately 55,000 people between 2015 and 2021 for graduating on time.

Finland’s policy of partially repaying state-funded student loans for those who complete their studies on time has led to more people taking out loans. The share of students who take out loans has increased from 55% to 63%, while the total amount of average loans has increased from around 12,000 to 14,000 euros.

Figures indicate that the state’s carrot to get people into the job market faster led to 55% of students graduating on schedule, up from 48% in 2014.

Loan repayments cover 40% of loans over €2,500.

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Nurses’ pay, ministerial machination and Finnish Olympic telephone policy https://thistuesday.org/nurses-pay-ministerial-machination-and-finnish-olympic-telephone-policy/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 07:36:13 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/nurses-pay-ministerial-machination-and-finnish-olympic-telephone-policy/ Finland does not prohibit athletes from bringing their personal phones to the Olympics. Nurses are paid less in Finland than in some neighboring countries. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle 18.1. 09:36•Update 18.1. 10:53 Helsingin Sanomat has an analysis (siirryt toiseen palveluun) the desire of county council candidates to raise nurses’ salaries. It’s a question in many electoral […]]]>

Finland does not prohibit athletes from bringing their personal phones to the Olympics.

Nurses are paid less in Finland than in some neighboring countries. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle

Helsingin Sanomat has an analysis (siirryt toiseen palveluun) the desire of county council candidates to raise nurses’ salaries. It’s a question in many electoral compasses, ahead of Sunday’s regional elections, and most politicians believe nurses’ pay should rise.

But they’re still unlikely to get an outsized pay rise, and HS explains why. Currently, wage negotiations are underway for city and regional government employees, including health care workers, but employers’ organizations say there is little money available to fund raises. higher salaries for nurses.

Perhaps surprisingly, unions aren’t too eager to see nurses get a better deal than other workers. With inflation higher than it has been in years, unions representing other municipal workers don’t want to see money that could go to their members diverted to a one-time boost for nurses.

Nurses unions disagree, of course, with Tehy’s Millariikka Rytkönen telling HS that the money should be found. She draws the comparison to the €70m the government found for peat producers in last year’s budget, suggesting there is a way to muster the political will.

Wage harmonization is another issue raised by employers. As care services are harmonized across 21 regional organizations, each employer must ensure that wages are consistent for their employees. In practice, this means an increase in the total cost of wages, as those on the lowest base salary are given a boost to match their higher-paid counterparts.

Rytkönen rejects that argument, but the trade-off is likely to be a 3-6 year deal that does something to address nurses’ relatively low pay in coming years.

Election candidates will have little to do with it, however, as Finland’s myriad wage bargaining systems ensure that unions and employers set the agenda even before the new county councils take office. function.

Aide Kuortane from Minister Kurvinen

Finland’s spending is on a leash at the moment, with new facilities hard to come by. Ilta-Sanomat covers a controversial decision made by the Minister of Sports Antti Kurvinen (Cen), who allocated funds for a new swimming center in his home region against the advice of experts and the swimming association.

Kurvinen approved the decision to build a new swimming center in Kuortane, a town of 3,500 people about 350 km from Helsinki which is home to Finland’s Olympic training centre.

The criteria for this particular pot of money is that the target should be a national training center, but the swimming federation was happy with its existing national training center in Helsinki and did not support funding for the Kuortane project. .

Neither the Olympic Committee, nor the National Sports Council, nor the senior ministry official. Kurvinen decided otherwise, pushing four million euros in funding to South Ostrobothnia. Kurvinen himself is a member of the council of the nearby town of Alavus and is currently running for a seat on the new South Ostrobothnia County Council.

Finland Telephone Policy

The Winter Olympics begin next month in Beijing, and many countries around the world are wondering how to respond to China’s digital surveillance.

Chinese authorities are believed to closely monitor phones and internet activity, which has led some Olympic teams, including Britain and the Netherlands, to ask their athletes to leave phones behind when they travel, report (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Iltalehti.

Finland doesn’t do the same, only offering advice to those fighting over Finland, but not requiring them to leave their devices behind.

The Olympic Committee is due to send out these guidelines in the coming days, but is not providing athletes with any phones to use while in China.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Covid Decisions, Delays in Booster Injections and Finns Return Abroad for Christmas | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-covid-decisions-delays-in-booster-injections-and-finns-return-abroad-for-christmas-news/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 07:27:19 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-covid-decisions-delays-in-booster-injections-and-finns-return-abroad-for-christmas-news/ It’s a big day for meetings before Christmas to discuss Covid restrictions. Vaccination centers are overflowing with impatient vaccines. Image: Petri Kivimäki / Yle Finland is in the throes of a sharp increase in Covid cases, and with the new Omicron variant seemingly more transmissible than previous versions of the coronavirus, there is a clamor […]]]>

It’s a big day for meetings before Christmas to discuss Covid restrictions.

Vaccination centers are overflowing with impatient vaccines. Image: Petri Kivimäki / Yle

Finland is in the throes of a sharp increase in Covid cases, and with the new Omicron variant seemingly more transmissible than previous versions of the coronavirus, there is a clamor for greater restrictions on daily life to try and slow the spread. .

Aamulehti has a good summary (siirryt toiseen palveluun) of the calendar. At noon, the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health and the National Institute of Health and Welfare (THL) will hold a briefing on the Covid situation.

THL boss Markku Terhahauta said on Saturday it was time to suspend use of the Covid pass to bypass restrictions on restaurant and bar opening hours, for example.

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At 4 p.m., ministers meet to discuss their national policy response. They can tighten the restrictions or stop the Covid pass clause that allows establishments requesting Covid passes to avoid any restrictions.

AL also notes the Pirkanmaa Covid coordination group meeting at 3:30 p.m. They will discuss what local restrictions they may impose for the Tampere area, with the choice apparently either to ban large events altogether or to severely restrict the number of people allowed to attend.

The all new Tampere Arena has seen several huge events in recent weeks, with a capacity of 13,000 spectators for ice hockey matches and concerts.

Restrictions are also on the agenda for Helsingin Sanomat, which is not avoiding the difficult timing of the current upsurge on a case-by-case basis, just before the holiday season.

The paper has a great feature (siirryt toiseen palveluun) on Finns living abroad returning home after more than a year without seeing their families, a reminder that the pandemic is considerably more difficult for people separated from their loved ones to overcome.

On the other hand, the paper editorial (siirryt toiseen palveluun) suggests that pubs and churches should be closed, remote working encouraged, and that people should spend Christmas at home with their families.

That’s how Finns make Christmas anyway, the newspaper says, so it shouldn’t be too difficult this year.

Delayed boosters

Many people are now trying to get a third dose of the Covid vaccine, and find that the dates are meager in the field. There is a gap between the three largest municipalities in the capital region, with Vantaa in the lead by offering boosters.

The northernmost Helsinki region council has been offering booster shots to anyone over the age of 18 since December 14, but Helsinki itself has only opened bookings for people not exposed to a high risk of Covid on Monday.

There have been complaints online that these times are mostly in January. But it’s better than the situation in Espoo, reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) Iltalehti, where those over 18 who are not in risk groups can only get their reminder appointments from Tuesday.

Even then, these periods are reserved for people aged 50 to 59. So far, only 15.5% of those over 12 in Finland have received three doses of the Covid vaccine.

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Olkiluoto begins

In energy news, Tuesday was a landmark day in Finnish history as the third reactor at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant finally began operating.

The very delayed reactor was ignited at 3:22 a.m. The local newspaper Satakunnan Kansa was at hand (siirryt toiseen palveluun) for this momentous event, noting that the west coast facility is expected to produce around 14 percent of Finland’s electricity needs.

The reactor should be connected to the Finnish grid in January.

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