Tuesday papers – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 12:31:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thistuesday.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-120x120.png Tuesday papers – This Tuesday http://thistuesday.org/ 32 32 Tuesday newspapers: Back to school, failed Covid strategy and building a wall | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-back-to-school-failed-covid-strategy-and-building-a-wall-news/ Tue, 10 May 2022 06:29:40 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-back-to-school-failed-covid-strategy-and-building-a-wall-news/ National outlets explore strikes, Covid death rates and walls to ward off hybrid attacks. Children return to class on Tuesday, following Finland’s school strike that closed schools and daycare centers in ten major cities. Image: Antro Valo / Yle 10.5. 09:29•Update 10.5. 09:50 Pupils are back in class on Tuesday after a 10-day strike by […]]]>

National outlets explore strikes, Covid death rates and walls to ward off hybrid attacks.

Children return to class on Tuesday, following Finland’s school strike that closed schools and daycare centers in ten major cities. Image: Antro Valo / Yle

Pupils are back in class on Tuesday after a 10-day strike by teachers demanding a general raise of 2%.

“In my heart, I feel like it was not good for the children,” said the head of student welfare services in the city of Helsinki. Vesa Nevalainentold HS.

Two years ago, the pandemic closed schools for eight weeks.

Professor at the University of Jyväskylä Marja-Kristiina Lerkkanen refers to studies indicating that learning gaps were still prevalent after the distance learning period.

A mediation proposal in the teachers’ dispute is expected later on Tuesday.

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Covid failure?

Lehtonen, noted that Finland has recorded more than 2,000 Covid-19 deaths since the start of the year, surpassing the combined number of deaths from 2020 and 2021.

“Covid deaths in March and April were very high in Finland,” he said, asking whether Finland had done enough to achieve the highest possible vaccine coverage.

“While Covid infections will likely decline over the summer, vaccine effectiveness will also decline. There is no certainty that the death toll will drop. If 200 people die a week, there will be many who will die if nothing is done about the situation,” he told HBL.

talk to the wall

Talks about building a fence on Finland’s border with Russia have resurfaced after emerging last fall during the migrant crisis at the Belarus-EU border.

Chairman of the Center Party Group Juha Pylvas noted that fences would be located near border checkpoints to help control possible hybrid operations.

Finnish border guards are currently preparing a proposal on how to fence off critical areas on the border, IS reports. The newspaper says most of the current fences were built to prevent domestic animals from escaping across the border.

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Strikes, Marin in Berlin and former British diplomat offers Finland protection https://thistuesday.org/strikes-marin-in-berlin-and-former-british-diplomat-offers-finland-protection/ Tue, 03 May 2022 06:40:30 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/strikes-marin-in-berlin-and-former-british-diplomat-offers-finland-protection/ A former British foreign secretary has called for an immediate expansion of NATO and a strengthening of resolve. Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague said Finland should be offered “full protection overnight” by NATO. Image: Kerim Okten/EPA 3.5. 09:40•Update 3.5. 11:48 Municipal strikes began Tuesday in cities across the country, affecting around 81,000 workers. Helsingin […]]]>

A former British foreign secretary has called for an immediate expansion of NATO and a strengthening of resolve.

Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague said Finland should be offered “full protection overnight” by NATO. Image: Kerim Okten/EPA

Municipal strikes began Tuesday in cities across the country, affecting around 81,000 workers.

Helsingin Sanomat wrote (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that day care centres, schools, libraries, catering services, sports halls and other municipal services are affected by the strike in Helsinki, Espoo, Vantaa, Kauniainen, Jyväskylä, Kuopio, Oulu, Rovaniemi, Tampere and Turku .

According to HS, the workers’ main demand is for a general wage increase of at least two percent. Olli LuukkainenPresident of the Bargaining Organization for Public Sector Professionals (Juko) spoke to HS about the inequality between municipal workers and public sector workers employed by the national government and the state-supported Lutheran Church.

Workers in these sectors have already concluded collective agreements governing their pay and working conditions for the next two years, as is common practice in Finland.

“It is well known that we are now at the 2% level. The State and the Church have agreed to a general increase of 2% without a strike, and now the employer is not ready for it on the municipal side. “, he told HS. .

The strike involves many unions, including Juko, the Confederation of Professional and Managerial Staff Unions (Akava), the Public Sector Union (JAU) and the Public and Social Sector Union (JHL).

Beyond the call for a 2% wage increase, some unions are advocating for additional increases in their specific areas on top of annual negotiations, with caregivers wanting a 3.6% increase per year for five years and JHL called for an additional 4.7% increase.

Additionally, Helsinki’s municipal construction services company, Stara, will be affected and halt many of its projects in the city, further delaying street cleaning until spring.

The strike is expected to last until Monday May 9, unless an agreement is reached by then.

Marin goes to Meseberg

According to Iltalehti, the German trip will offer prime ministers Sanna Marin (PDS) and Madeleine Anderson a platform for an open and strategic dialogue with Scholz and other German officials on possible NATO membership and the long-term situation with Russia.

Schloss Meseberg is an important symbol for diplomatic missions in Germany, similar to Camp David in the United States, and serves as a retreat for the German Chancellor and an official guesthouse for the Federal Republic of Germany.

Iltalehti wrote that Finland’s message to Germany is that this is about long-term change without backpedaling, even if the conflict in Ukraine ends.

Germany wants to send a message to the outside world, primarily to Russia, that it supports its Nordic partners in the final stages of the NATO membership decision, IL wrote.

Marin has made diplomatic rounds over the past two months, with 11 face-to-face meetings with various foreign leaders in March and April.

The retreat to Schloss Meseberg won’t be long for Marin, as she travels to Copenhagen to meet other Nordic prime ministers at a summit with the Indian prime minister. Narendra Modi.

Besides the meeting with the German Chancellor, Marin will discuss with his Swedish counterpart the political situation in Finland. According to Iltalehti, discussions on Sweden’s NATO membership are slightly behind those of Finland, whose security policy review is due to be completed on May 13. For reference, Finland’s safety review ended on April 13.

The former head of British diplomacy on Finland-NATO: “Total protection overnight”

Hague’s comments came in light of Finland’s foreign minister Pekka Haavisto (Green) said it might take Finland four months to a year to officially join NATO, even with accelerated procedures.

“It requires the political will and legal ingenuity to extend full Article 5 protection – mutual defense – to Finland and Sweden literally overnight, with a clear declaration signed in all Allied capitals followed by a ratification process in record time,” Hague wrote. .

His article argues that it is imperative to extend protection to Finland and Sweden as soon as possible, citing the example of North Macedonia and Montenegro joining in 2016.

ISIS claims Russia was behind a 2016 coup attempt in Montenegro, aimed at overthrowing the country’s pro-Western government and derailing its NATO membership.

“[If] Putin fumed at such small additions, imagine how he will feel later this month when Finland and Sweden are expected to apply to join the alliance,” Hague added.

The Hague also described the benefit of Finland and Sweden joining the alliance as a benefit to the organization of 30 member states.

“Their accession would be a significant geostrategic event, adding to NATO’s modern air forces, in the case of Finland, large reserves of trained personnel, doubling the land border between NATO and Russia and considerably strengthening the defense of the Baltic States,” Hague wrote.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Åland’s Conscription, Empty Apartments and Chinese Electric Vehicles | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-alands-conscription-empty-apartments-and-chinese-electric-vehicles-news/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 06:27:42 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-alands-conscription-empty-apartments-and-chinese-electric-vehicles-news/ The media explores the limits of military service, ghost apartments and the buzz around electric vehicles. Åland is a Swedish-speaking maritime province of Finland. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle 26.4. 09:27•Update 26.4. 15:40 Finnish party chair Rikka Purra said on Monday that residents of the island of Åland should no longer be exempt from military service, according […]]]>

The media explores the limits of military service, ghost apartments and the buzz around electric vehicles.

Åland is a Swedish-speaking maritime province of Finland. Image: Silja Viitala/Yle

Finnish party chair Rikka Purra said on Monday that residents of the island of Åland should no longer be exempt from military service, according to the Swedish-language daily Hufvudstadsbladet (siirryt toiseen palveluun). Purra claimed that the exemption policy was linked to language issues. The Åland Islands are a predominantly Swedish-speaking region.

Justice Ministry Anna Maja Henriksson (SPP), whose portfolio also covers Åland affairs, told the newspaper that the change in the security environment was not a reason to review conscription.

She added that Finland’s potential NATO membership would not change Åland’s demilitarized status.

The media reported on Monday the Speaker of Parliament Matti Vanhanen (Cen) saying he hoped Åland would take the initiative to deploy Finnish troops to the province.

The League of Nations granted Finland sovereignty over Åland in 1921. The island municipalities had requested reunification with Sweden at the time of Finnish independence in 1917. As a compromise, Finland agreed to grant self-government to the people.

Åland was demilitarized after the Crimean War in 1856. The Treaty of Paris concluded that year stipulates that there can be no military presence on the island, but Finnish border guards operate stations there.

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ghost apartments

Property prices in Helsinki have seen the fastest growth in 10 years, but high prices in inner-city neighborhoods aren’t stopping wealthy buyers from buying second homes in the capital, the daily reports Helsingin Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun).

“These are opera apartments,” Juhana Brotherus, chief economist at mortgage lender Hypo, told HS. The term refers to holiday homes used to explore the cultural places of the capital.

This trend means there is an increasing number of empty apartments, according to HS. More than 15,000 apartments in the central districts of Helsinki are unoccupied, representing 11% of the housing stock in the inner city districts. In Kluuvi, near the central station, almost 40% of apartments are vacant.

Chinese VE

The BYD T3 is a compact electric van said to offer ranges of up to 310 km on a single charge, depending on speed and conditions.

The van costs just under 50,000 euros, according to KL.

Electric vehicles have been in high demand this spring, with buyers having to wait up to six months for a car. The shortage of supply has led many Finnish customers to order electric vehicles without seeing them.

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Tuesday’s Newspapers: Stop Russian Gas, Majority of MPs Support NATO and Royal Visit | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-stop-russian-gas-majority-of-mps-support-nato-and-royal-visit-news/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 06:19:01 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-stop-russian-gas-majority-of-mps-support-nato-and-royal-visit-news/ Left-wing leader Andersson wants European countries, including Finland, to stop funding Vladimir Putin’s war. An oil refinery in Moscow. EU countries have already paid Russia more than 20 billion euros for oil, gas and coal since February 24. Image: Maxim Shipenkov/EPA The Russian invasion of Ukraine has changed the conversation around energy in Finland, as […]]]>

Left-wing leader Andersson wants European countries, including Finland, to stop funding Vladimir Putin’s war.

An oil refinery in Moscow. EU countries have already paid Russia more than 20 billion euros for oil, gas and coal since February 24. Image: Maxim Shipenkov/EPA

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has changed the conversation around energy in Finland, as a large part of Finland’s energy needs are supplied by Russia.

“Europe will continue to fund Putin’s military operations and Putin’s regime as long as Russia’s fossil fuel dependency is as high as it is now in Europe,” Andersson told Iltalehti.

Andersson pointed to the hypocrisy of Finland spending 1.7 billion euros on new arms acquisitions, while funding Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“We must work to get rid of Russian energy, which is financing this war, as soon as possible. It is not viable for Finland to strengthen its own defense on the one hand, and to finance Russia’s war with the other by buying fossil fuels from it”. “Andersson told Iltalehti.

According to Andersson, around 20 billion euros have flowed from the EU to Russia since the start of the invasion on February 24.

In April, the Finnish government announced a €700 million package on energy and the green transition.

“Reducing dependence on fossil fuels is also a matter of security policy in these times. It is really important that Finland now invests heavily in moving away from Russian energy and increasing its energy self-sufficiency,” said explained Andersson to Iltalehti.

Andersson also stressed that Fennovoima’s project with Rosatom, Russia’s state-owned nuclear company, should not be built. The planned nuclear power plant at Pyhäjoki was abandoned amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine, but the project site is still there.

“Today, the Fennovoima project is a big elephant in the room for Finnish policymakers,” Andersson added.

The simple majority of deputies support NATO

Of Finland’s 200 MPs, 105 have expressed support for NATO membership according to an analysis by Helsingin Sanomat. The analysis was based on a compilation of different sources, including HS polls, Yle polls and MPs’ press releases.

In the analysis, 13 MPs were not in favor of NATO membership, 36 MPs were unable to comment, and the remaining 46 were unknown or uncertain at this time.

Parliament will begin discussing the report examining Finland’s amended security policy as it meets on Tuesday from the Easter recess.

There is uncertainty as to whether a simple or two-thirds majority in Parliament would be required for NATO membership. Speaker of Parliament Matti Vanhanen (CEN) has set up a coordination group to deal with this and other issues surrounding the progress of any bid for NATO membership. In order to achieve a two-thirds majority, 134 MPs would have to support NATO membership.

The initiative to apply for NATO membership would be taken by the President and the government and, in principle, could be taken at any time.

Finland gets royal treatment

Ilta Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) reported that Prince Michael of Kent is in the middle of a three-day trip to Finland. The royal visit is organized by the British and Commonwealth Chamber of Commerce in Finland (B3CF).

“The purpose of this visit is to promote investment and trade relations between Britain and Finland. The prince is coming to our country as a sponsor of the Genesis initiative,” the president said. Garry Parker of the B3CF declared to Ilta-Sanomat.

An active Freemason, Prince Michael is one of the few members of the Royal Family who does not receive a taxpayer subsidy through the UK Civil List, but does have an apartment in Kensington Palace.

The Genesis Initiative is a UK program that promotes discourse on economic issues for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and encourages development and cooperation between Britain and its international partners.

Prince Michael last visited Finland in 2017 and recalled having fond memories of the country.

“My last trip to Finland left me with many positive memories,” Prince Michael told Ilta-Sanomat.

During his speech at a gala in 2017, the prince said he liked the openness and friendliness of Finns.

The royal itinerary includes a trip to Tampere where he will visit a few businesses and the recently built Nokia Arena. The prince will end his trip in Helsinki, visiting local businesses, as well as a gala at Svenska Klubben. The gala dinner will host 100 people, kantele performances and Sir John Stuttard will present the prince with his book Pre-war Rolls-Royce motor cars with a Finnish connection.

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Tears at the gas pump, food supply opportunities and the NHL star who won’t be named https://thistuesday.org/tears-at-the-gas-pump-food-supply-opportunities-and-the-nhl-star-who-wont-be-named/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 05:39:01 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tears-at-the-gas-pump-food-supply-opportunities-and-the-nhl-star-who-wont-be-named/ A Finnish commentator declined to name a hockey player supporting Putin during games. Switching to an electric vehicle is too expensive for many Finns. Image: EPA/All Over Press 12.4. 08:39•Updated 12.4. 10:10 Rising fuel prices have been difficult for many people to manage. In rural Finland, where distances are greater and services fewer, people have […]]]>

A Finnish commentator declined to name a hockey player supporting Putin during games.

Switching to an electric vehicle is too expensive for many Finns. Image: EPA/All Over Press

Rising fuel prices have been difficult for many people to manage. In rural Finland, where distances are greater and services fewer, people have been hit hardest.

“Driving is as minimal as it gets besides school and work. Even so, I cry every time I fill up,” said a 19-year-old woman in the HS questionnaire.

Another woman said that she reduced the frequency of her children’s leisure activities, because the 100 km round trip cost 20 euros in fuel each time they went.

Some said they would cut back on the essentials to better afford the gasoline they need, but that wasn’t a sustainable option.

Many of those who responded to the survey said they had considered buying an electric vehicle to reduce fuel costs, but the acquisition would be too expensive for them.

HS notes that help is on the way. The tax deduction for commuting will be temporarily raised in July from 7,000 euros to 8,400 euros. Last week’s budget also relaxed the requirement for oil companies to include biofuels in the diesel mix.

This will fall from 19.5% to 12% for two years, but experts say the impact on prices at the gas pump could be negligible.

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Invest in hunger

The cost of food is also rising globally, due, among other things, to supply chain shocks caused by the war in Ukraine.

The paper focuses on agricultural technology investments, rather than speculation in commodity markets, and offers several investment funds that provide a portfolio with some exposure to the latest food production technology.

Food security is not limited to agriculture, according to Vesa Engdahl of Front Wealth Management, and there is a big difference between investing in the cash price of different grains and investing in companies that seek to improve food security.

“We really have big challenges globally, and in agriculture and grain production there is a lot to do,” Engdahl said. “For example, in India, around 40% of agricultural produce spoils due to poor logistics and storage.”

There has not yet been a big return on these investments. Beyond Meat, a vegetarian protein company, and Oatly, which makes vegan dairy alternatives, both saw their stock prices plummet.

Analysts say KL has potential, however, thanks to ‘megatrends’ of population growth and climate change.

Poutinist Hockey

Russian media picked up a Finnish ice hockey commentator by Tero Kainulainen unique way to call Washington Capitals NHL games.

Kainulainen recently declined to use the Capitals captain’s name, Alexander Ovechkin, in his comments. Ovechkin is known as a supporter of Putin, posting photos of him with the authoritarian Russian leader and refusing to criticize the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Instead of saying his name, Kainulainen uses formulations like “number eight”, “captain of the Capitals” or even “gray beard”.

This has annoyed some in Russia, according to Ilta-Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun). Vyacheslav Fetisova former hockey player who is now a member of the Russian State Duma and a former sports minister, said Kainulainen’s habit was “not even worthy of attention”.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Presidential Approval, 2024 Chances, and Climate Issues in the Budget | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-presidential-approval-2024-chances-and-climate-issues-in-the-budget-news/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 06:03:27 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-presidential-approval-2024-chances-and-climate-issues-in-the-budget-news/ The war in Ukraine could spur action on another major crisis facing humanity. President Sauli Niinistö’s approval ratings are high. Picture: Jaani Lampinen/Yle 5.4. 09:03•Updated 5.4. 11:13 It is not surprising that the President Chez Sauli Niinisto approval ratings are high, after his extensive international diplomacy around Russia’s attack on Ukraine and the parallel debate […]]]>

The war in Ukraine could spur action on another major crisis facing humanity.

President Sauli Niinistö’s approval ratings are high. Picture: Jaani Lampinen/Yle

It is not surprising that the President Chez Sauli Niinisto approval ratings are high, after his extensive international diplomacy around Russia’s attack on Ukraine and the parallel debate over a possible Finnish NATO bid.

Some 86% of those polled said they were satisfied with Niinistö’s work, while around 63% said the same of the prime minister. Sanna Marin (SDP), 66% liked the Minister of Defense Antti Kaikkonen‘s(Cen) efforts and 62 percent said the Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto (Green) had given satisfactory results.

Niinistö’s score plummeted, with 55% saying they were “very satisfied” with his performance and 31% “quite satisfied”.

The poll was conducted between March 25 and 30, with 1,081 respondents who asked their opinion of Finland’s senior politicians in charge of foreign and security policy.

Hopes 2024

While the current president is very popular, his term expires in 2024 and prevents him from running again due to Finland’s constitution.

There had been talk that Finland might be without a head of state, but that’s over now: prime ministers have too much to do to skillfully manage relations with Russia at the same time.

Regardless of what Russia does or Finland’s response, it remains a neighbor, and KL says the channel for discussion must remain open.

In 2024, the newspaper looks at the main candidates, even though no one has said they are running, and suggests that maybe Alexander Stubb may have to return to the Finnish elections.

Stubb said he would avoid domestic politics and currently works at the European University Institute, but KL suggests a primarily international role such as the presidency might be tempting.

Climate alarm

Ministers meet on Tuesday for discussions on the fiscal framework, and there are tough choices to be made.

Iltalehti has a comment (siirryt toiseen palveluun) which examines how choices made now to respond to war could either exacerbate or help solve the climate crisis, following a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

According to the IPCC, we will also need to use unproven airborne carbon capture technology if we are to have any chance of mitigating the worst, as well as significantly reducing emissions.

Iltalehti recaps the missed opportunities, including the vast subsidies given to Finnair without weather conditions (unlike the subsidies given to Air France, for example), but says that now the war in Ukraine makes the task even more urgent.

While previous spending limits are to be set aside and support is on the way for the agriculture and energy sectors, ministers have big problems to tackle when setting out spending plans.

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Tuesday’s papers: Hostile nations, pension positivity and Covid pressure | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-papers-hostile-nations-pension-positivity-and-covid-pressure-news/ Tue, 29 Mar 2022 06:09:06 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-papers-hostile-nations-pension-positivity-and-covid-pressure-news/ National media are exploring Russia’s designation of Finland as a “hostile” country. The last Allegro train from St. Petersburg for the foreseeable future arrived in Helsinki on Sunday evening. Image: Ylé 29.3. 09:09•Update 29.3. 13:21 Russia’s attack on Ukraine has changed Finland’s relationship with its eastern neighbor. The most recent development on this front came […]]]>

National media are exploring Russia’s designation of Finland as a “hostile” country.

The last Allegro train from St. Petersburg for the foreseeable future arrived in Helsinki on Sunday evening. Image: Ylé

Russia’s attack on Ukraine has changed Finland’s relationship with its eastern neighbor.

The most recent development on this front came on Monday, when Moscow said it planned to restrict the entry into Russia of citizens of “unfriendly” states, including Finland, Iltalehti reports. (siirryt toiseen palveluun)citing Russian news agency Interfax.

The visa retaliatory measures would apply to citizens of EU states, the UK and the US, among others.

While the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov did not give details of the restrictions, for example countries were deemed “unfriendly” for sending military equipment to Ukraine.

“Retreat okay”

To allay concerns about demographic challenges, she told the business daily that Finland’s pension system was viable.

“I want to tell the young people that they will have their retirement,” Sarkkinen told KL.

She did, however, encourage people to aim for long professional careers. “At the individual level, the biggest determinant is the length of career, the number of interruptions in professional life and the level of salary.”

The employment rate for older workers, aged 60 to 64, was almost 57% in 2021. According to the Center for Pensions, the employment rate for the entire age group has risen sharply over the past year. over the past two decades.

The covid continues

As of Monday, some 1,060 Covid patients were being treated in Finnish hospitals, including 42 in intensive care.

Monday marked the first time the number of Covid patients exceeded 1,000 since the crisis began more than two years ago.

Finland has recorded some 860,000 lab-confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic two years ago.

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Tuesday Newspapers: Exploitation of Ukrainians, Emergency Liquidity and Omicron Saturation | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-exploitation-of-ukrainians-emergency-liquidity-and-omicron-saturation-news/ Tue, 22 Mar 2022 07:14:57 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-exploitation-of-ukrainians-emergency-liquidity-and-omicron-saturation-news/ Fake recruiters try to lure Ukrainians into Finnish jobs that don’t exist. International aid groups are warning of human traffickers trying to exploit the exodus of Ukrainian women and children from the war-torn country. Image: Jussi Nukari/Lehtikuva 22.3. 09:14•Update 22.3. 09:36 Across Europe, there are growing fears that traffickers and fraudsters are exploiting Ukrainian women […]]]>

Fake recruiters try to lure Ukrainians into Finnish jobs that don’t exist.

International aid groups are warning of human traffickers trying to exploit the exodus of Ukrainian women and children from the war-torn country. Image: Jussi Nukari/Lehtikuva

Across Europe, there are growing fears that traffickers and fraudsters are exploiting Ukrainian women fleeing war. Helsingin Sanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) reports that the phenomenon has reached Finland, detailing a secret investigation by the STT news agency.

Ads on Ukrainian recruitment sites advertise well-paid jobs at Finnish factories such as Sinebrychoff and Huhtamäki that don’t actually exist, according to the companies themselves. The advertisements require candidates to pay a fee to apply for positions that do not require specialization or knowledge of the local language.

To warn citizens of the risks of exploitation, Ukrainian officials sent text messages through local mobile operators warning people of traffickers and urging them to turn down shady job offers.

cash is king

The Consumers’ Union of Finland is urging people to save a week’s worth of physical cash outlays, according to IS.

“It’s worth estimating how much you need based on your regular spending. Imagine how much you would need to manage if the entire digital payment infrastructure was down,” said Juha Beurling-Pomoellgeneral secretary of the Consumer Observatory.

Omicron up

Coronavirus infections rise again in Uusimaa after three-week downward trend, says Asko JarvinenChief Physician and Head of the Infectious Diseases Department of the Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District (HUS).

“I’m not worried about running out of intensive care places. I’m more concerned about older people who haven’t been vaccinated getting seriously ill,” he told HBL.

Vaccine experts in Finland are expected to make a decision on rolling out the second Covid vaccine boosters this week.

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Tuesday newspapers: visit to the United Kingdom, advocacy for biodiversity and nuclear hope | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 06:48:56 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesday-newspapers-visit-to-the-united-kingdom-advocacy-for-biodiversity-and-nuclear-hope-news/ President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media. The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle 15.3. 08:48•Updated 15.3. 16:44 Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings. He was […]]]>

President Sauli Niinistö traveled to Britain to meet colleagues and media.

The Olkiluoto plant could help reduce Finland’s dependence on Russian electricity. Image: Esa Syväkuru / Yle

Most newspapers talk about the president Chez Sauli Niinisto visit to the UK, with a busy schedule of security-related events and meetings.

He was attending a meeting of the Joint Expeditionary Force, a UK-led Nordic and Baltic security coalition.

Along with this, Ilta-Sanomat reports (siirryt toiseen palveluun) whom he also met Prince Charlesincorporating a Tweet in which Niinistö claimed to have had “substantive” discussions with Niinistö.

Paper leads with by Vladimir Putin signing his last call with Niinistö, which ended with the Russian leader saying “I am available”.

Niinistö said he thought it might be a tactic, to appear open to talks, but also seemed keen to talk and might want to reach out to Western leaders.

The big call he would like, according to Niinistö, is the American president Joe Biden. He said it could happen “in the near future”.

Beware of beetles

A Helsingin Sanomat editorial (siirryt toiseen palveluun) protests against the forest plantations that dominate the Finnish countryside, highlighting a concrete threat to this limited ecosystem.

Spruce bark beetles are a healthy part of a normal forest, which has a multitude of different tree species and dead tree trunks on the ground providing natural habitats for many beetle predators.

In plantations, however, monoculture allows these tiny insects to run wild. A spruce plantation has only spruce trees, a perfect environment for beetles to fight their way through, killing the trees that are their food.

The document says that efforts to protect biodiversity are underway, but must take into account the social and economic importance of forests in Finland.

Nuclear to the rescue

Finland’s energy mix has been in the news recently, with Russia’s attack on Ukraine raising questions about both the Rosatom-backed Fennovoima project and the import of electricity from Russian power plants.

Business newspaper Kauppalehti suggests (siirryt toiseen palveluun) in an editorial that this dependence could soon end, thanks in part to the Olkiluoto 3 reactor which went online over the weekend.

The newspaper estimates that on Monday alone, imports from Russia amounted to some 3.7 million euros – a sharp increase in Russia’s hard currency reserves, as sanctions continue to isolate the country’s economy.

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Tuesday’s Newspapers: NATO Executive, Anti-Russian Sentiment, Supermarket Quarrel | News https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-nato-executive-anti-russian-sentiment-supermarket-quarrel-news/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 07:12:57 +0000 https://thistuesday.org/tuesdays-newspapers-nato-executive-anti-russian-sentiment-supermarket-quarrel-news/ The Finnish government is preparing to submit a report to Parliament that could serve as the framework for a debate on NATO membership this spring. The debate on NATO membership continues in Finland. Image: EPA-EFE/All Over Press 8.3. 09:12•Update 8.3. 11:52 Tuesday marks the 13th day of Russia’s war on Ukraine, with the invasion and […]]]>

The Finnish government is preparing to submit a report to Parliament that could serve as the framework for a debate on NATO membership this spring.

The debate on NATO membership continues in Finland. Image: EPA-EFE/All Over Press

Tuesday marks the 13th day of Russia’s war on Ukraine, with the invasion and its aftermath once again dominating newspaper headlines in Finland.

Helsingin Sanomat, the most widely circulated daily, writes (siirryt toiseen palveluun) that the government is preparing to submit a report to parliament that could play a key role in how policymakers discuss Finland’s modified and changing foreign and security policies.

HS adds that the main purpose of the report is to ensure that MPs have enough information to discuss the issues, but a source tells the newspaper that it also “provides a framework for the NATO debate”.

The main politicians of the country, including the president Sauli Niinisto and prime minister Sanna Marin (SDP) – have so far remained silent on their position on Finland’s potential NATO membership, HS explaining that their reluctance is necessary in order to ensure as open a debate as possible.

“It is quite difficult for the parties to genuinely discuss NATO membership if, for example, the President and the Prime Minister have shared their views in one way or another,” the newspaper writes. .

In a separate article, HS asks (siirryt toiseen palveluun) what NATO membership would mean for Finland, looking at the issue from angles such as defense budgets, military preparations and cooperation with the EU.

But the bigger question, HS points out, would be the impact on Finland’s relations with Russia.

This relationship – especially in political and economic terms – has virtually collapsed since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, writes HS, noting that the Russian Foreign Ministry has said a few times recently that a Finland’s application for NATO membership would have “military and political consequences”.

“Underlying Russia’s opposition is the idea that the prestige of a great power is weighed against losses and gains in the geopolitical game. Each new member of NATO is thus considered as a kind of loss of prestige”, explains Katri Pynnöniemiassistant professor at the National Defense University.

Anti-Russian sentiment on the rise

Tampere-based Aamulehti is one of several newspapers to report (siirryt toiseen palveluun) from the STT news agency that hate speech against Russians living in Finland has increased since the invasion of Ukraine.

Niina SinkkoPresident of the Finland-Russia Association, recounts how even her organization – which AL says is not politically aligned and aims to strengthen cross-cultural cooperation at the local level – has also been targeted.

“The mission of our organization has been misunderstood by many. It is believed that we support or receive funds from the Russian regime. That was never the case,” Sinkko said, adding that the harsh rhetoric continued despite the group condemning the Russian regime. invasion on its website and social media channels.

“Yet there is a stigma that has been directed at our employees and our members,” she said.

AL adds that Russian speakers are the largest minority language group in Finland, with more than 84,000 people speaking Russian as their mother tongue in Finland in 2020, according to Statistics Finland.

But in practice, an even larger group uses the language on a day-to-day basis and – notes the paper – people who speak Russian can come from many different countries, including Ukraine and Estonia.

Nearly 30% of the Ukrainian population speaks Russian as their native language, and for someone who doesn’t know both languages, Russian and Ukrainian may even sound the same.

“In the worst case, such anger can even be directed at a refugee who has escaped war,” Sinkko points out.

A Lidl too far?

Reports from the business magazine Taloussanomat (siirryt toiseen palveluun) following German supermarket chain Lidl’s announcement that no products from Russia or Belarus will feature in the supermarket chain’s ‘Eastern European Week’, which begins at its outlets on Thursday Finnish.

However, writes Taloussanomat, the company also decided to remove the “Russian-style” products from the week of special offers, causing a mixed reaction on social networks.

“I don’t understand why the grocery store [Lidl] begins to discriminate against Russian culture. This does not affect the state but ordinary Russians,” wrote one commentator.

“There is no reason to demonize Russian food culture, and culture in general, even in a situation like this. It would suffice to remove anything that benefits the economy of the Russian state, and therefore to its ability to wage war,” said another.

Meri Aaltomanager of the channel’s campaigns department, tells Taloussanomat that the decision to remove all Russian-related products was motivated by a desire to avoid confusion among customers.

“Although the themed products do not include products made in Russia, we have decided to exclude individual Russian-style products with, for example, text in Russian or other clear references to Russia,” says Aalto. .

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